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Case Study: Multiple Issues, Multiple Solutions - Case management with 2 years of objective data

Case Study: Multiple Issues, Multiple Solutions - Case management with 2 years of objective data

By Rhodes Bell Equinosis Certified Pracitioner Rhodes Bell, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | Diagnostic Blocks, Quarter Horse, R Bell

May 2018  Signalment 5-year-old Quarter Horse mare used for barrel racing.  Presenting Complaint Mare was noted to be off for the previous 3 weeks after initiating training for barrels.  Initial physical and moving exam findings:  Upon presentation the horse was bright, alert, and responsive. Her vital parameters were within normal clinical limits. Mild left femoropatellar joint and right forelimb fetlock joint effusion was palpable.  She was not sensitive to application of hoof testers to any foot. A RF lameness was observed and measured (Head VS 29.6 mm). A mild RH impact lameness was also measured (Diff Min Pelvis...

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Case Study: Avoiding a Common Pitfall in the Evaluation of Diagnostic Analgesia in a Mild Lameness Case

Case Study: Avoiding a Common Pitfall in the Evaluation of Diagnostic Analgesia in a Mild Lameness Case

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | Diagnostic Blocks, KG Keegan, OES Members Only

Signalment and history A 17-year-old Quarter Horse gelding presented for evaluation of left hindlimb lameness of 8–10-week duration.  He was diagnosed with a keratoma in the left front foot one year ago which does not seem to bother him. Physical Examination The horse stood with the left hindlimb slightly externally rotated. There was sensitivity on palpation of the lateral condyle of the femur in the left hindlimb. No stifle effusion was noted. There was palpable evidence of bone spavin on the dorsal medial surface of the left hock, but the Churchill test was negative. Picking up the left...

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Case Study: Multiple Issues, Multiple Solutions - Case management with 2 years of objective data

Case Study: Avoiding a Common Pitfall in the Evaluation of Diagnostic Analgesia in a Mild Lameness Case