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Top 7 Mistakes In Data Collection and Interpretation of the Lunge Evaluation

Top 7 Mistakes In Data Collection and Interpretation of the Lunge Evaluation

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Data Collection, Locked, LT Schroeder, Lunging

1. Lunging without conducting a straight-line evaluation.  While it may not always be possible to get good consistent straight-line data (in which case lunging can help), lunging can complicate an otherwise straightforward straight-line evaluation. It is important to remember that reference ranges for asymmetric head and pelvic movement have not been established for lunging. Because lunging induces torso tilt, which can affect head and pelvic movement symmetry, and this effect is also surface dependent, lunging interpretation is more complex. Increased variability inherent in lunging can increase the difficulty of evaluation. If the lameness is measurable and consistent (repeatable with 2 contiguous...

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Using Inertial Sensors in Research: What to Take into Consideration

Using Inertial Sensors in Research: What to Take into Consideration

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | KG Keegan, Reference Range, Research

A Conversation with University of Missouri Professor of Equine Science Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS   WHY USE INERTIAL SENSORS OVER OTHER METHODS OF OBJECTIVE MEASUREMENT? DR. KEVIN KEEGAN In my honest opinion, if you are only interested in measuring lameness in horses, for whatever reason, then the only way to do it practically today is with body-mounted inertial sensors. If you are interested in measuring something else, for example rider position on the horse, limb movement effects with shoeing, or if you are interested in developing a method of lameness evaluation that is not based upon...

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Clinical Tip: How to Conduct a Baseline For Evaluating Flexion Tests

Clinical Tip: How to Conduct a Baseline For Evaluating Flexion Tests

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Flexion Manipulation, Locked, LT Schroeder

Evaluating provocation tests like flexion or manipulation tests requires a baseline of like number of strides, and on the same surface, to compare against. There are two ways to create a baseline before flexion or other provocation tests using Lameness Locator Touch.  The first option is to use your last baseline straight trial performed prior to commencing provocation tests.  The flexion/manipulation test comparison report functionality will truncate the baseline straight trial to the first 8 strides of the collection.   The second option is to conduct a separate baseline, using the “before flexion” trial type. This trial label...

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Stride Selection in Lameness Locator

Stride Selection in Lameness Locator

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Locked, LT Schroeder, Stride Selection

The Automated Stride Selection Lameness Locator® software makes an automated stride selection based on a window around the median stride rate.  The gyroscope in the RF sensor determines an instantaneous stride rate and then calculates a median stride rate throughout the collection. The default stride selection includes all strides with a stride rate within 10% of the median stride rate. This was found to be the best window to include regularly trotting strides and exclude non-trotting strides (such as when the horse stops to turn around).  This 10% window is automatically increased in increments of 10% (up to...

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All

Top 7 Mistakes In Data Collection and Interpretation of the Lunge Evaluation

Using Inertial Sensors in Research: What to Take into Consideration

Clinical Tip: How to Conduct a Baseline For Evaluating Flexion Tests

Stride Selection in Lameness Locator

Lunging: The 7 Dire Errs to Good Data Collection and Interpretation

Ridden Evaluation – The Aid of Objective Measures

Rehabilitation of the Equine Athlete: Evaluating Objective Data

The Importance of Stabilizing the Lameness

Is Every Horse Lame? What to Consider When Using The Q in Baseline Evaluations

Don't Miss the Boat: Turning Misperceptions into Efficiencies

Why Lunging Can Complicate An Evaluation: The Effects Of Torso Tilt, Surface, and Lameness

User Tip: The Consequence of RF Sensor Rotation

10 Common Data Collection Mistakes

Means & Standard Deviations: An Overview & Practical Application to Lameness Locator® Reports

Using the Q to Evaluate Lameness Under Saddle

Utilizing Inertial Sensors in the Pre-Purchase Evaluation