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FAQ: Can the Q be used on a gaited horse?

FAQ: Can the Q be used on a gaited horse?

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | Data Collection, Data Interpretation, FAQ, Gaited Horses, KG Keegan

In general, the ambling (single foot, or 4-beat) gaits decrease the vertical movement of the horse's trunk, making it easier to “sit”. Consequently, to maintain some vertical momentum, the horse’s vertical head movement becomes exaggerated.  Because of the way The Q (Lameness Locator®) displays results relative to “expected” vertical movement, this may cause underestimated forelimb lameness, overestimated hind limb lameness, and increased variability.  Also, for the ipsilateral gaits, the evaluator must flip the hind limb results (i.e. reported RH lameness is really LH lameness), because the inference of footfall from the right forelimb gyroscope is off by ½ of a stride cycle, (i.e. the left hind foot is on the ground when it is assumed that the right hind limb foot is on the ground).     For The...

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FAQ: Will the Q's Data Analysis be Correct if a Sensor is Placed on Backwards?

FAQ: Will the Q's Data Analysis be Correct if a Sensor is Placed on Backwards?

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Data Interpretation, FAQ, LT Schroeder

I realized my head sensor was accidentally placed backwards after collecting data. Will the analysis be correct? A head or pelvic sensor can be applied backwards and still provide an accurate analysis because the analysis uses the vertical acceleration of the sensor and the sensing element is fitted in the center of the sensor (not off to a side). While recent generation Lameness Locator® sensors have the capability of measuring more than just vertical acceleration, these signals are not necessary for the current analysis for lameness and, therefore, are not utilized outside of research applications.  Using special “Research...

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FAQ: What's a Q Score, and How Can I Use It?

FAQ: What's a Q Score, and How Can I Use It?

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | Data Interpretation, FAQ, KG Keegan

"Quantification of Asymmetry": In Lameness Locator® 2017, Equinosis introduced a report metric called the Q Score. The Q score, or quantification of asymmetry, is a summary of the measurements that provides the limb, timing and amplitude of asymmetry, irrespective of whether the asymmetry is above or below defined thresholds.  There is one Q score for the forelimb evaluation and a combined Q score for the hind limb evaluation. The Q scores are different for fore and hind. Because the upward and downward movement of the head is related (due to its attachment to the torso via the neck, which acts...

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FAQ: Hind Limb Outliers – Do You Need to Worry About Them?

FAQ: Hind Limb Outliers – Do You Need to Worry About Them?

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Data Interpretation, FAQ, LL2017, LT Schroeder, Software Navigation

Lameness Locator® includes an automated outlier removal algorithm for head movement asymmetry; however, pelvic movement outliers are currently not removed. This is because significant hind limb outliers are quite uncommon, given the lower natural stride to stride variability of pelvic movement. But occasionally a horse will do something odd, such as stumble or kick out.   The program stride selection (which is based on the median stride rate), may still include this/these errant strides in the analysis if they are of the same stride rate as other strides, thus including a potential hind limb outlier.  Typically, a single outlier...

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All

FAQ: Can the Q be used on a gaited horse?

FAQ: Will the Q's Data Analysis be Correct if a Sensor is Placed on Backwards?

FAQ: What's a Q Score, and How Can I Use It?

FAQ: Hind Limb Outliers – Do You Need to Worry About Them?