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Step 1 - What Are You Trying to Measure?

Step 1 - What Are You Trying to Measure?

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | Editorial, KG Keegan, Objective vs. Subjective Opinion

Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, Diplomate, American College of Veterinary Surgeons I often get asked by colleagues and fellow equine lameness investigators to compare inertial sensors to other methods of objective lameness measurement. My question in return is, “What are you trying to measure?" In my honest opinion, if you are only interested in measuring lameness in horses, for whatever reason, then the only way to do it practically today is with body-mounted inertial sensors. If you are interested in measuring something else, for example rider position on the horse, limb movement effects with shoeing, or if you are interested...

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Acceptance & Resistance of Lameness Measurement  – Seasoned Lameness Experts Sound Off

Acceptance & Resistance of Lameness Measurement – Seasoned Lameness Experts Sound Off

By Nancy Loving Nancy S. Loving, DVM, Loving Equine Clinic | Updated on | NS Loving, Objective vs. Subjective Opinion

Wellness exams and lameness evaluations often pose challenges for equine practitioners to pin down the root of a horse’s problem. Get it right and the client is forever indebted and is quick to voice confidence in your skills. Get it wrong, and they may abandon your practice and look elsewhere for veterinary expertise.  Yet, in today’s diagnostic armamentarium, there is a powerful tool that has the potential to increase not just client confidence in your expertise but also your own confidence in developing a diagnosis. Inertial sensor systems provide an objective analysis of a horse’s gait. Despite access...

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Visual Assessment of Lameness: Limitations and Pitfalls

Visual Assessment of Lameness: Limitations and Pitfalls

By Nancy Loving Nancy S. Loving, DVM, Loving Equine Clinic | Updated on | NS Loving, Objective vs. Subjective Opinion

There has been a long-standing discussion amongst many equine veterinarians about the confidence they feel using the naked eye to evaluate and assess lame horses.  Many feel certain that they have a keen eye and can discern even subtle gait asymmetries, and think that there is little need for objective assessment using inertial sensor modalities. A recent webinar presented by Maarten Oosterlinck, DVM, PhD, DECVSMR, DECVS and Sandra Starke, BSc, MSc, PhD cited interesting data on how such self-assessed confidence in visual assessment may not be all it seems. At the start of the discussion, Oosterlinck notes that it...

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When Subjective Opinion Disagrees with Inertial Sensor Measurements

When Subjective Opinion Disagrees with Inertial Sensor Measurements

By Kevin Keegan Kevin G. Keegan, DVM, MS, DACVS | Updated on | Data Collection, Data Interpretation, Editorial, KG Keegan, Objective vs. Subjective Opinion, OES Members Only

Whenever I use the Equinosis Q, which is on every lameness case, treatment checkup, or pre-purchase, I also always do a subjective lameness evaluation, determining and often times declaring my subjective impression regarding where (i.e. which limb or limbs) I think the lameness is. Sometimes there is disagreement between my subjective opinion and the results of the inertial sensors. What is my take on this? The short and easy answer is, "I was probably wrong". This happens occasionally and it no longer bothers me or my clients, or the students or house officers I am training. I am...

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All

Step 1 - What Are You Trying to Measure?

Acceptance & Resistance of Lameness Measurement – Seasoned Lameness Experts Sound Off

Visual Assessment of Lameness: Limitations and Pitfalls

When Subjective Opinion Disagrees with Inertial Sensor Measurements

An Inside Look At Objective Evaluation: All-Access Investigation of the Equinosis Q

Man with Machine Versus Man Without Machine: Debunking the Myths

Redefine Lameness? Accommodating the Layman’s Perspective on Lameness