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Lunging: The 7 Dire Errs to Good Data Collection and Interpretation

Lunging: The 7 Dire Errs to Good Data Collection and Interpretation

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Locked, LT Schroeder, Lunging, OES Members Only

1) Lunging in one direction only or interpreting lunging data based on only one direction. Tilt of torso introduces asymmetry of head and pelvic vertical movement in many horses. While not all horses lunge symmetrically left to right, evaluating only one direction is meaningless without comparing the measured asymmetry to the opposite direction. Certain patterns of asymmetric movement, for example lack of pushoff on the outside limb in soft ground, especially if of equal amplitude in either direction, may be normal (Fig. A).  Without comparing results from both directions this may not be appreciated. Use the LUNGE COMPARISON REPORT to...

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Why Lunging Can Complicate An Evaluation: The Effects Of Torso Tilt, Surface, and Lameness

Why Lunging Can Complicate An Evaluation: The Effects Of Torso Tilt, Surface, and Lameness

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Locked, LT Schroeder, Lunging, Lunging Complications, OES Members Only, Surface Determination

Lunging is a common component of many veterinarians’ lameness evaluations.  With the increased sensitivity of inertial sensors, lameness is often measurable in the straight line even if not visible subjectively. However, lunging can be necessary to lateralize a bilateral lameness, is helpful to stabilize a lameness, and may offer additional insight to the clinical picture, for instance observing whether the lameness is worse on the inside or outside of the circle.  While the established thresholds, or reference ranges, were determined for straight line evaluations only, the Equinosis Q can be used for lunging, yet the veterinarian must be aware of...

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Lunging: The 7 Dire Errs to Good Data Collection and Interpretation

Why Lunging Can Complicate An Evaluation: The Effects Of Torso Tilt, Surface, and Lameness