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Clinical Tip: How to Conduct a Baseline For Evaluating Flexion Tests

Clinical Tip: How to Conduct a Baseline For Evaluating Flexion Tests

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Flexion Manipulation, Locked, LT Schroeder

Evaluating provocation tests like flexion or manipulation tests requires a baseline of like number of strides, and on the same surface, to compare against. There are two ways to create a baseline before flexion or other provocation tests using Lameness Locator Touch.  The first option is to use your last baseline straight trial performed prior to commencing provocation tests.  The flexion/manipulation test comparison report functionality will truncate the baseline straight trial to the first 8 strides of the collection.   The second option is to conduct a separate baseline, using the “before flexion” trial type. This trial label...

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Stride Selection in Lameness Locator

Stride Selection in Lameness Locator

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Locked, LT Schroeder, Stride Selection

The Automated Stride Selection Lameness Locator® software makes an automated stride selection based on a window around the median stride rate.  The gyroscope in the RF sensor determines an instantaneous stride rate and then calculates a median stride rate throughout the collection. The default stride selection includes all strides with a stride rate within 10% of the median stride rate. This was found to be the best window to include regularly trotting strides and exclude non-trotting strides (such as when the horse stops to turn around).  This 10% window is automatically increased in increments of 10% (up to...

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Lunging: The 7 Dire Errs to Good Data Collection and Interpretation

Lunging: The 7 Dire Errs to Good Data Collection and Interpretation

By Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder Laurie Tyrrell-Schroeder, DVM | Updated on | Locked, LT Schroeder, Lunging, OES Members Only

1) Lunging in one direction only or interpreting lunging data based on only one direction. Tilt of torso introduces asymmetry of head and pelvic vertical movement in many horses. While not all horses lunge symmetrically left to right, evaluating only one direction is meaningless without comparing the measured asymmetry to the opposite direction. Certain patterns of asymmetric movement, for example lack of pushoff on the outside limb in soft ground, especially if of equal amplitude in either direction, may be normal (Fig. A).  Without comparing results from both directions this may not be appreciated. Use the LUNGE COMPARISON REPORT to...

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Rehabilitation of the Equine Athlete: Evaluating Objective Data

Rehabilitation of the Equine Athlete: Evaluating Objective Data

By Christina Frigast Christina Frigast, MRCVS, CERP, ECP | Updated on | C Frigast, Locked, OES Members Only, Rehabilitation

Do you use your Equinosis Q Lameness Locator® for assessing treatment over time? If not, then you are missing out on a great opportunity. The Equinosis Q is invaluable in the work up of subtle or multiple limb lameness. It can make a complex lameness case seem simple and help you resolve it faster and with more confidence. When I first started using the Equinosis Q, which is now more than five years ago, I didn’t imagine the impact the system would have on my approach to lameness and nevertheless the career path I found myself following. As a...

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All

Clinical Tip: How to Conduct a Baseline For Evaluating Flexion Tests

Stride Selection in Lameness Locator

Lunging: The 7 Dire Errs to Good Data Collection and Interpretation

Rehabilitation of the Equine Athlete: Evaluating Objective Data

Don't Miss the Boat: Turning Misperceptions into Efficiencies

Why Lunging Can Complicate An Evaluation: The Effects Of Torso Tilt, Surface, and Lameness

User Tip: The Consequence of RF Sensor Rotation

10 Common Data Collection Mistakes

Means & Standard Deviations: An Overview & Practical Application to Lameness Locator® Reports

Using the Q to Evaluate Lameness Under Saddle

Utilizing Inertial Sensors in the Pre-Purchase Evaluation